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Complete Nutrition Profile and Benefits of Eating Lamb

Due to its impressive nutrition profile, lamb is perhaps the healthiest commonly available meat.

This article will analyze the complete nutritional values of lamb.

Additionally, we will examine the science-backed health benefits of lamb to show why it is one of the healthiest foods around.

What is Lamb?

Lamb refers to the meat of a sheep in its first year.

The meat from these animals is usually produced when the sheep is between 1 and 12 months old.

Lamb is a kind of red meat because it has a high myoglobin content, an iron-rich protein found in the muscle of animals.

Myoglobin contains heme, which is a pigment that gives meat its red color (1).

All meat and poultry contain myoglobin, but beef and lamb contain much larger concentrations hence their classification as red meat.

Lamb is a nutrient-dense food, and it is rich in protein, vitamins and essential minerals.

Key Point: Lamb means the meat of a sheep under one year of age. It is a nutritious form of red meat.

The Difference Between Lamb and Mutton

Before we get started looking at the health benefits, many people wonder how lamb compares to mutton nutritionally.

The definition is quite simple;

  • Lamb: Meat from a sheep under 12 months old.
  • Mutton: Meat from a sheep over the age of one year.

While this all sounds very simple, there are further key differences between the two types of meat.

Lamb

Lamb meat enjoys far greater popularity than mutton due to its tenderness and milder flavor.

Studies show that the texture of lamb deteriorates with advancing age. As a result, some farmers produce lamb from as young as one month old (2).

Mutton

As sheep eat large quantities of grass throughout their life, mutton meat becomes very fatty and imparts a much stronger flavor.

Additionally, the meat is chewier and doesn’t have the tenderness of lamb.

However, some people have a taste preference for the higher fat content and stronger flavor.

Key Point: Lamb is meat from a young sheep while mutton comes from older animals. Lamb is more tender, but has a lower fat content compared to mutton.

Nutrition Facts

The nutritional value of lamb is impressive; it contains a range of beneficial nutrients including protein, healthy fats, vitamins and minerals.

The tables below show the full range of nutrients in cooked domestic lamb (leg shank) per 100 grams (3).

Calories and Macronutrients

Macronutrient / Calories Amount (Grams / Kcal)
Calories 243 kcal
Carbohydrate 0 g
Fiber 0 g
Sugar 0 g
Fat 13.5 g
Saturated Fat 5.6 g
Monounsaturated Fat 5.7 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.0 g
Omega-3 190 mg
Omega-6 730 mg
Protein 28.4 g

As shown above, lamb is a mixture of fat and protein.

Lamb fat mainly comes from equal parts saturated and monounsaturated fat. Among the fatty acids, oleic acid is the most predominant (4).

For those who are unaware, this monounsaturated fatty acid is also the primary fat in olive oil (5).

Compared to most meat, lamb also has a much higher omega-3 content.

However, as a domestic American lamb, the meat shown in the table is likely grain-finished.

Opt for pasture-raised lamb for an even better provision of omega-3.

Vitamins

Here is the vitamin profile; as shown, lamb is an excellent source of B vitamins – particularly vitamin B12.

Vitamin Amount (Grams / % RDA)
Vitamin B12 38%
Vitamin B3 27%
Vitamin B2 11%
Vitamin B5 6%
Vitamin K2 5%
Vitamin B6 5%
Folate 4%
Vitamin B1 3%
Vitamin E 1%

Minerals

Lamb is incredibly rich in minerals, especially iron, phosphorus, selenium and zinc.

Mineral Amount (Grams / % RDA)
Zinc 51%
Selenium 44%
Phosphorus 17%
Iron 12%
Potassium 7%
Copper 6%
Magnesium 5%
Sodium 3%
Calcium 2%
Manganese 1%
Key Point: Lamb has a very healthy nutrition profile and it contains a wide variety of essential nutrients. It is a significant source of B vitamins, zinc and selenium.

10 Health Benefits of Lamb Meat

Aside from the nutrient profile, lamb has many other nutritional benefits.

Here are ten good reasons to eat lamb.

1. Lamb Contains L-Carnosine

The Molecular Element For L-Carnosine.

L-Carnosine is a compound that contains two amino acids (proteins) bonded together; beta-alanine and histidine.

Only certain foods contain carnosine in high amounts, and lamb is one of these.

Per 100 grams, lamb contains – on average – 400mg of carnosine, which is slightly higher than beef (365mg) (6).

L-Carnosine’s Health Benefits

Firstly, carnosine is classed as a non-essential nutrient because our bodies can make it internally.

However, recent research is showing that higher amounts of carnosine from external sources may offer additional health benefits.

Among these, carnosine appears to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, meaning that it may help to protect against cardiovascular disease (7, 8).

Notably, carnosine also helps to reduce the glycation of sugars and proteins in our body.

Glycation leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

Unfortunately, AGES are harmful compounds which directly cause inflammation and oxidative stress, and they are believed to be one of the keys to the aging process (9, 10).

Key Point: Lamb is among the best dietary sources of carnosine, a healthy compound that may have powerful health-protective properties.

2. Lamb is a Significant Source of Complete Protein

A Bone-In Lamb Chop On a White Background.

One of the biggest positives from eating lamb is the protein content.

Lamb is extremely rich in protein, and depending on the cut it contains anywhere between 25 – 30 grams per 100 grams (11, 12, 13).

While it is common knowledge that lamb is an excellent source of protein, not all protein is made the same.

In other words; the efficiency by which our body can use protein differs depending on the specific food and the amino acids it contains.

On the positive side, lamb contains every amino acid, and we can, therefore, class it as a ‘complete’ protein.

This completeness means that our body can use lamb protein more efficiently than ‘incomplete’ proteins in plant foods.

Protein is incredibly important for our health, and it encourages lean muscle mass, the growth and repair of cells, and higher levels of satiety (14, 15, 16).

Key Point: Lamb contains a significant amount of high-quality protein.

3. Lamb Is Incredibly Nutrient Dense

While some people like to judge food based on how many calories it contains, the caloric load says little about the food’s relative health merits.

The best measurement of the health properties of a particular food is nutrient density.

Lamb passes the nutrient-density test with flying colors, and here is a quick summary of why;

  • Lamb contains large amounts of healthy fat, including more omega-3 than most land animals and high levels of oleic acid.
  • High concentrations of bio-available, highly digestible protein.
  • A substantial amount of vitamins and minerals; particularly B vitamins and zinc.
  • A range of beneficial compounds including creatine, glutathione, conjugated linoleic acid, carnosine and taurine.
Key Point: Lamb contains a large range of beneficial compounds, and as a total package it offers a lot.

4. A Surprising Source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

In the modern world, most people are consuming too much omega-6 and not enough omega-3. This issue is important because omega-3 fatty acids have an anti-inflammatory effect, while omega-6 is pro-inflammatory.

Providing these two essential fatty acids are relatively balanced, they are both useful and beneficial. However, some people are now eating a diet that is approaching 20:1 in favor of omega-6 to omega-3 (17).

Removing omega-6 vegetable oils such as soybean oil is a great way to change this. Additionally, consuming omega-3 fatty acids from seafood (especially oily fish) helps us to get more omega-3.

However, land animals can also be rich in omega-3.

This is especially the case for animals raised on pasture. As one such animal, lamb tends to be an excellent source of omega-3.

In pasture-raised lamb, the levels of omega-3 are higher than grain-finished animals.

As an example, 100 grams of grass-fed lamb rib contains 580 mg of omega-3 and 750 mg of omega-6; nearly a 1:1 ratio (18).

Key Point: Lamb meat – especially pasture-raised – is rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

5. An Important Source of Heme Iron

A Diagram Showing the Structure For the Molecular Compound Heme.

Many different foods contain iron and it is present in everything from spinach and kale to bananas and tomatoes.

However, just as the digestibility of protein differs, not all iron is made the same.

When it comes to digestion and absorption, heme iron is king.

In fact, we can absorb approximately 15-35% of heme iron (found in animal foods), but this absorption rate drops to 10-15% for non-heme sources of iron (plant foods) (19).

It is unfortunate to see the rise of iron-deficiency anemia.

Over the period between 2004 and 2013, iron-deficiency anemia rates in the US population nearly doubled to 5.6%. During the same decade, red meat consumption fell by 19% (21, 22).

Importantly, lamb contains a rich source of heme iron in amounts similar to other red meat such as beef.

Key Point: Lamb contains large amounts of heme-iron, which is an important nutrient in the face of rising iron-deficiency anemia.

6. Lamb Contains a Significant Amount of Creatine

Creatine will be well known to anyone with interest in working out and/or sporting performance.

Markedly, creatine can help to boost muscular endurance, strength and – potentially – muscle mass (23).

While creatine supplements are very popular, this compound also occurs naturally in various foods.

Red meat is the most substantial dietary source of creatine and lamb contains approximately 300-500 mg per 100 grams (24).

Although this is not close to the same level as creatine supplement dosages (3 – 5 grams per day), it should still have a physiological benefit – especially for those eating higher amounts of lamb and beef.

Key Point: Lamb contains beneficial amounts of creatine, a compound that can help to improve sporting performance.

7. Lamb is a Source of the “Master Antioxidant” Glutathione

A Diagram Showing the Chemical Formula For Glutathione.

People often refer to glutathione as “the master antioxidant” because of the critical role it plays in protecting our health and our internal antioxidant defense systems (25).

We cannot read too much into this since there is no clinical research on humans, but higher glutathione levels track with a longer lifespan in animal studies (26, 27).

Notably, our body makes the glutathione compound internally from the amino acids cysteine, glutamic acid and glycine.

However, research suggests that consuming more exogenously (from outside sources; i.e. food) could have advantages.

On this note, a further health benefit of lamb is that it contains glutathione (28).

Also, it contains all three amino acids that our body requires to synthesize glutathione internally.

Key Point: Lamb contains glutathione and it also provides all the essential prerequisites for our body to make its own glutathione.

8. Lamb Contains Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)

Lamb contains a source of the natural trans-fatty acid CLA.

Firstly, don’t worry about the name ‘trans fat’ because the naturally occurring version found in animal foods is much different from synthetic trans-fat (29).

In fact, it may even have some health benefits.

For instance, a meta-analysis of 18 controlled trials demonstrates that supplementing with isolated CLA “produces a modest fat loss in humans” (30).

Furthermore, research shows that people with higher tissue levels of CLA have a reduced risk for myocardial infarction (heart attack) (31).

However, correlation does not necessarily equal causation. To illustrate this point, the people with higher levels of CLA were likely consuming more meat and dairy (and probably less refined carbohydrate).

In other words, it is difficult to pinpoint precisely what is lowering the risk.

Either way, lamb meat is richer in CLA than any other meat and contains approximately 4 – 19.0 mg CLA per gram of fat content.

By comparison, beef typically contains 1.2 – 4.0 mg while pork and poultry contain less than 1.0 mg (32).

Key Point: Lamb is the single biggest dietary source of CLA.

9. A Source of Healthy Fats

A Fatty Cut of Fresh Lamb Meat Steak On a Tray.

These kinds of ‘health benefit’ lists generally do not mention fat.

After years of health authorities demonizing dietary fat, that is not really a big surprise.

However, let’s give fat the credit it deserves; good fat is an essential and healthy part of the human diet.

Furthermore, two specific fatty acids in lamb are very beneficial for us;

  • Omega-3: Lamb meat from animals raised on pasture has similar levels of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids as some fish (18).
  • Oleic acid: This monounsaturated fatty acid is one of the most evidence-based fats and it is widely known as the “heart healthy” fat in olive oil. Research consistently links oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation and better health markers (33, 34, 35, 36).
Key Point: Lamb contains a variety of natural, healthy fats, with oleic acid and omega-3 being particularly notable.

10. Lamb is Tasty!

This one is not really a health benefit, but it is always challenging to enjoy supposedly “healthy” (flavorless) low-fat products.

On the other hand, lamb genuinely is nutrient-dense and a healthy food. It is doubtful that anyone would complain about the taste of it.

Put simply; lamb is one of the tastiest (and healthiest) foods in the world.

Are There Any Concerns About Lamb Meat?

There are several concerns about lamb meat, but nothing too worrying.

1. Red Meat and Cancer Risk

To start with, a range of epidemiological (observational) data suggests that red meat may increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

However, there isn’t any strong causative evidence for this, and there are many confounding factors: see here for a full analysis.

2. Lamb Contains Cholesterol

Some people still worry about the cholesterol content of animal products due to the decades of warnings against dietary cholesterol.

However, rigorous systematic reviews and meta-analyses have shown that dietary cholesterol is not a nutrient of concern (37, 38).

3. Affordability

Depending on location, lamb can be reasonably priced or it can be very expensive.

As a result, affordability can be an issue.

If this is an issue, it could be worth looking at the cheaper cuts of lamb such as neck, shoulder, or even ground meat.

Final Thoughts

Lamb is a very nutritious food that is full of protein, healthy fats and a wide range of micronutrients.

All in all, lamb is possibly the best choice of meat for those looking for the most health benefits.

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How to manage detox side-effects

Pathogen & Parasite Die-Off Symptoms: How to manage detox side-effects

Whether it’s bacteria, yeast or parasite die-off symptoms, they can be a real struggle for many clients during a healing protocol. Understanding what causes die-off symptoms, the most common die-off symptoms experienced by clients, as well as ways to reduce their severity are all an important part of managing a natural protocol for SIBO, parasites, candida and numerous other pathogenic gut infections.

Here’s everything we’re going to cover:
> The science of die-off symptoms and why they occur.
> Why not all symptoms are die-off related.
> Common causes of die-off symptoms.
> The most common die-off symptoms when treating parasites and other pathogens.
> Ways to prevent and minimize die-off symptoms naturally.

Herxheimer reaction: The original bacteria die-off symptoms

The forefather of what we call die-off is known as the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (JHR). A Herx reaction, as it is commonly called, was first documented by European dermatologists Adolf Jarisch and Karl Herxheimer at the end of the 19th century. Their observation related to the short-term worsening of skin lesions (symptoms) after treatment with mercury (antibiotics). After syphilis began being treated with penicillin in the 1940s, Herx reactions were observed to occur within the first 24 hours of treatment and consisted of fever, chills, headaches and worsening of skin rashes. This is also called a healing crisis and many health practitioners will inform you that you will get worse before you get better.

And while the JHR only technically relates to spirochetal infections (spiral-shaped bacteria) and antibiotics, the concept of symptom-onset or worsening after starting treatment with antimicrobials has been seen to apply more broadly in clinical practice. This is why you’ll often hear practitioners talk about a Herx-reaction, even if it isn’t scientifically accurate. But, what we call ‘die-off symptoms’ is certainly something we see commonly when clients begin addressing bacteria, parasites and yeast pathogens using natural antimicrobials.

Parasite Die Off Symptoms

The die-off process is broken down into three distinct phases:
1. Cell death
2. Immune response
3. Detoxification

1. Cell death

Simplistically, as we treat pathogens like parasites, bacteria and yeast, they begin to die. This ‘cell death’ starts a cascade of reactions in the body that often end in new or increased symptoms. But what exactly happens during the ‘cell death’ process?

Pathogen Cell Death - Die Off Symptoms.png

As shown in the diagram above, we think of ‘cell death’ as having two distinct phases; biofilm breakdown and the release of glycoconjugates. Let’s explore each one in a little more detail and explain their impact on die-off symptoms.

Phase 1 – Biofilm breakdown: biofilm is formed when individual microorganisms attach to the GI tract and clump together into a kind of colony. The biofilm acts as a shield or protective home for the bacteria, parasites or yeast living inside, making them difficult to detect and remove. Once we breakdown this protective matrix using natural biofilm busting supplements, it can release the individual pathogens out into the GI tract.

Phase 2 – Release of glycoconjugates: we try our hardest to be scientifically accurate with our posts, which is why we’ve used the term glycoconjugates instead of the more commonly used term ‘endotoxin’. This is because endotoxins really only apply to bacteria and we’re trying to cover parasites and yeast as well. But, the concepts are largely the same across the different organisms. We have lipopolysaccharides (LPS) for bacteria, GPI-anchored glycolipids for parasites and beta-glucans for yeast (e.g. candida). When each of the different organisms’ cell membranes start to breakdown, these glycoconjugates (toxins) will be released, triggering an inflammatory response.

2. Immune response

All of these various glycoconjugates act as toxins when released after the destruction of the cell wall of the main organism, which trigger pro-inflammatory responses. Basically your immune system starts working overtime to kill and clear these toxins from your body to avoid infections hanging around. LPS specifically, is also an exogenous pyrogen or fever-inducing substance, which explains the flu-like bacteria die-off symptoms experienced by many people during eradication. While inflammation is a natural response of the immune system and needed to overcome infection, it can, in the short term, lead to symptoms like aches and pains, skin rashes, headaches, etc, which we often describe as die-off.

3. Detox

All of the broken down biofilm and released toxins need to go somewhere. With a healthy GI tract, strong intestinal lining and regular motility, most of these toxins would move through the large intestine and be excreted via the stool. However, the majority of clients with a gut infection or overgrowth don’t have a healthy GI tract, but rather what we call a ‘leaky gut’.

A leaky gut is the simple term for intestinal hyperpermeability, a condition that allows macromolecules and microorganisms to get through the intestinal lining and into the bloodstream. This becomes problematic when you have a significant release of pathogens and toxins at the same time. As some of these toxins leak through the intestinal lining and enter the bloodstream, your immune system will continue to attack them and try to clear them from your body – firstly via the lymphatic system and liver, which help filter your body’s waste, before being sent to other drainage organs such as your kidneys, colon and skin.

This is not necessarily a problem in those with well-functioning detox pathways, it is what those systems are designed for and in healthy people can work just fine. Unfortunately, for many of those suffering from years of chronic digestive symptoms, these detox pathways can become blocked or sluggish. This means the body struggles to eliminate these toxins and allows them to recirculate in the body. This inability to eliminate toxins can make bacteria, yeast and parasite die-off symptoms more noticeable and last longer.

Common causes of die-off symptoms

Now that we understand the mechanisms of die-off symptoms, it’s time to look at the common causes. If die-off symptoms are the result of cell death, the release of toxins, inflammation and the body’s inability to clear these toxins, then the next question is: what causes such changes to occur? The three most common causes of die-off symptoms we see are:

> Starting an elimination diet. Switching to a real-food based diet that eliminates processed foods, sugar and other ingredients that feed pathogens will often cause the bad bugs to starve as we cut off their food supply. This effect is enhanced on certain IBS elimination diets like low-FODMAP, Paleo AIP and SIBO Bi-Phasic which are more extreme in the removal of foods that feed pathogens (e.g. sugar and other carbs).

> Introduction or increase of probiotics. Starting a probiotic protocol can effectively kill pathogens by overpowering them with the presence of ‘good guys’.

> Starting a protocol of antimicrobial, anti-fungal or anti-parasitic supplements. This is the most common and effective way to kill pathogens quickly and typically results in the most die-off symptoms.

Why not all symptoms are die-off related

Before we get into more detail about the common die-off symptoms, it’s important to understand that not all symptoms experienced while treating parasites, bacteria or yeast overgrowths are die-off related. There is a tendency to classify all kinds of reactions as die-off symptoms, but this isn’t always the case. Here are other possible reasons for symptom flares during eradication:

> Supplement or food reactions. Food intolerances and sensitivities are common in those with gut dysfunction and a leaky gut. Food reactions are typically an immune response to the proteins in certain foods, commonly eggs, nuts, gluten and dairy, rather than pathogen cell death.

> Parasite life cycles. Parasites typically have life cycles that can last between 7 and 21 days, meaning symptoms can flare during certain phases of these life cycles. If you find that you regularly have a good week or two and then feel terrible for a few days, this could be a sign that your parasites are alive, rather than dying.

> Other sources of inflammation. Because inflammation is at the heart of die-off symptoms, many other sources of inflammation can be confused with them.These other sources of inflammation could be mental/emotional or stress-related, new gut infections, excessive exercise or other forms of stress on the body.

Common bacteria, yeast and parasite die-off symptoms

Die-off symptoms are often similar to those of pathogen infections themselves, given that they are caused by the same types of toxins. The key difference is that bacteria, yeast and parasite die-off symptoms are generally more intense as these toxins are released in larger amounts in a shorter space of time. This is why it is normal to feel worse, for a few days at least, before feeling better.

The most common bacteria, yeast and parasite die-off symptoms are:
> Fatigue
> Headaches
> Body aches and pains
> Skin rashes or reactions
> Mood symptoms (e.g. anxiety and depression)
> Respiratory phlegm or stuffy nose
> Increased GI upset
> Flu-like symptoms (e.g. fever and chills)

Die-off symptom: Fatigue

Fatigue is probably the most common die-off symptom reported by clients. Healing can be hard work, especially if your body is trying to fight a heavy load of pathogenic infections or parasites. During the early phase of an elimination protocol, you need to give yourself space to rest and fight, without placing too many additional stressors on the system.

Die-off symptom: Headaches

Detox and headaches often go hand in hand for many clients. While it can be exacerbated by the process of pathogen cell death, for many clients the biggest contributor to headaches is actually the removal of certain inflammatory foods like caffeine and sugar from their diet.

Die-off symptom: Body aches and pains

Body aches and pains are a very inflammatory type of symptom. With die-off, it is the inflammatory response of the immune system to the release of toxins that if overactive, can create these symptoms of muscle soreness and aching joints.

Die-off symptom: Skin rashes and reactions

The skin is a key elimination organ and your body may well try and eliminate excess toxins via the skin if the other systems of the body are overworked. If you’re the type of person who has skin issues, you may experience an increase or worsening of rashes, eczema or psoriasis flares, skin sores or breakouts. These are typically short-term reactions that quickly resolve themselves, but can be frustrating to manage.

Die-off symptom: Mood symptoms (e.g. anxiety and depression)

The connection between gut health and mood symptoms is well documented – we even wrote a whole blog about it HERE. As with other die-off symptoms, mood symptoms such as anxiety and depression can also flare during pathogen eradication. While these can be difficult to accept, awareness that your current mood is the result of temporary pathogen die-off and not other elements of your life circumstances, often makes riding out this phase more bearable.

Die-off symptom: Respiratory phlegm or stuffy nose

The body uses mucus and phlegm to capture and eliminate toxins. It is why we get a ‘runny nose’ when we have a cold or flu. It is for the same reason that an increase in mucus production is a common sign of die-off, as your body uses all the systems it has to help excrete these excess toxins.

Die-off symptom: Increased GI upset

With all the action happening in the gut, it is no surprise that increased GI upset is common during die-off. Diarrhea or constipation, bloating, gas and abdominal pain are often reported as pathogens die and excrete toxins into the gut. This is where the infection is and the site of their cell death. GI symptoms are also the most likely to be associated with non-die-off related causes discussed above such as food reactions and general symptom flares related to parasite life cycles, for example.

Die-off symptom: Flu-like symptoms (e.g. fever and chills)

Flu-like symptoms are the original Herx reaction observed over a hundred years ago. This type of die-off symptom is probably the most serious and is typically associated with spirochetal infection treated with heavy doses of antibiotics. A fever is also one of the ways the body tries to kill infections as most microbes can’t operate at high temperatures. Given the lower doses, longer timeframes and titration associated with natural antimicrobial herbs, flu-like symptoms are less common outside of conventional treatment.

Bacteria, Candida and Parasite Die Off Symptoms

Managing die-off symptoms

Effectively managing die-off symptoms requires an understanding of the various mechanisms causing them. This is why we spent so much time at the beginning of the post explaining the reasons why we get die-off symptoms. As a quick recap, the three difficult variables that impact die-off symptom severity are:
1. Quantity and speed of pathogen cell death – this will determine the size of the ‘toxic burden’ your body has to manage.
2. How active your immune system is and therefore the amount of inflammation your body creates.
3. How effective your detox pathways are at clearing toxins from your body.

With this is mind, our approach to minimizing die-off symptoms has three corresponding elements which we will discuss in more detail below:
1. Titration – the layered introduction of diet and supplements.
2. Reducing inflammation – helping calm the body’s immune response.
3. Supporting detox pathways – assisting the body with clearing toxins through our detox organs.

Titration of diet and natural supplements

Titration is the gradual introduction of a specific intervention. The faster and more intense an intervention, the bigger the release of toxins from dying pathogens will be in a short space of time. What we’re trying to do is to avoid dropping a bomb on an overgrown weed garden and then having to deal with the thousands of spores that get spread all over the rest of the neighborhood. What we’d prefer to do is go in there and weed the garden more selectively to avoid the negative repercussions.

To prevent or minimize the amount of die-off symptoms that our clients have to cope with, we use the following three titration strategies:

1. Natural antimicrobials – unlike antibiotics, natural antimicrobials or herbal supplements are typically a much more gentle approach to addressing pathogens and parasites. They are still pretty powerful and certain varieties can still cause die-off symptoms in my clients but these are generally less than typically caused by antibiotics.

2. Diet introduction – we like to start clients on an introduction gut-healing diet after our initial consultation and before we receive test results back. This typically gives us around a month for any effects of diet changes to settle down before starting a supplement protocol and introducing antimicrobials.

3. Supplement titration – we like to introduce one supplement at a time and build each product up slowly to full dose before moving onto the next. This allows us to monitor any reactions to particular supplements separately to die-off symptoms and adjust our dosing recommendations accordingly. It also means there is a slow build-up to the pathogen eradication process, reducing the quantity and speed of cell death your body has to manage. This contrasts with conventional antibiotic recommendations which start at full dose from day one, which is just one of the reasons this approach typically results in greater die-off symptoms.

Reducing inflammation

If you have a very active (or overactive) immune system, you can experience quite a lot of inflammation-related die-off symptoms. Symptoms like fatigue as well as body aches and pains are common amongst those with high levels of inflammation. There are two main ways we help to manage inflammation:

1. Rest and reducing stressors – giving your body the space to fight and heal from pathogenic infections is an important part of managing inflammation. This means prioritizing plenty of good quality sleep, especially between the hours of 10pm and 2am, as this is when the majority of physical repair happens in the body. It also means avoiding activities that will add additional stress to your body – like intense or excessive exercise. It can be challenging for your body to overcome inflammation if you are constantly adding more sources to the pile.

2. Anti-inflammatory foods and supplements – giving your body a natural anti-inflammatory boost can assist with reducing the severity of inflammation-related die-off symptoms. Our go-to anti-inflammatory supports include:
> Omega-3’s – from good quality fish oil supplements or food based sources such as flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and oily fish.
> Anti-inflammatory spices – adding turmeric, ginger and cinnamon to your food or having them in tea is an easy option.
> Antioxidants from green leafy vegetables and dark colored berries.
> Additional supplements like glutathione, quercetin and vitamin C can also help when needed.

Supporting detox pathways

Helping your body to clear excess toxins via our detox organs is an important part of avoiding die-off symptoms and also reducing their severity after onset. The two most effective ways we have found to support these detox pathways include:

Liver support: The liver is the primary organ we focus on to remove bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the bloodstream. The same applies for other glycoconjugates from parasites and yeast. It is this removal function that helps to reduce die-off symptoms. Our goal is to support both phase 1 and phase 2 liver detoxification pathways, typically using supplements that are a blend of naturals like N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC), St Mary’s Thistle, Dandelion and many more. We are also able to use markers on lab testing to assess phase 2 liver detoxification to know whether additional support in this area will be required during your protocol.

GI binders: GI binders can be used to bind up toxins like a magnet and carry them all the way through the digestive tract to be eliminated in the stool. By cleaning up these excess toxins, it prevents them from being absorbed (or reabsorbed) into the bloodstream and causing further die-off symptoms. There are three different types of binders we typically use to assist clients minimize die-off symptoms:

> Charcoal – activated charcoal is a broad spectrum binder that works extremely well in acute cases of die-off symptoms. Because it can bind to microbes as well as minerals, vitamins and nutrients, it is best used on a short-term basis and taken well away from other foods, medications or supplements. It is our affordable go-to option to get on top of die-off symptoms quickly.

> Clays – bentonite, zeolite and pyrophyllite clays are more selective (less broad-spectrum) than charcoal but can still bind to some nutrients. This means they are a gentler form of binder that can be taken for weeks rather than days.

> Chlorella – an algae with a love of toxins, chlorella is a great ongoing support product to assist with die-off and toxins associated with eradication protocols. As a living organism, it binds to toxins rather than essential nutrients which means it can be used as an ongoing preventative support throughout your protocol. It is unlikely to provide relief once die-off symptoms hit, but that’s what we have charcoal and clays for.

Additional strategies to support detox and minimize die-off symptoms

Here’s a few additional strategies we often recommend to boost our client’s detox pathways and help minimize symptoms of die-off:
> Hydration – simple but effective, keeping fluids up during a protocol can help flush toxins through the system.
> Epsom salt baths – the benefits of epsom salt baths include; 1) that they are relaxing 2) can increase magnesium levels to help with aches and pains 3) will help draw toxins from the skin and 4) can increase sulfate levels which is helpful for liver detox.
> Infrared sauna – some clients have reporting benefits from using infrared sauna during a protocol. Whether it is due to their relaxing effects or their reported ability to increase your blood circulation and stimulate the sweat glands, releasing built-up toxins in the body, these results may vary from person to person. Keeping up hydration and restoring electrolytes is important if you choose to experiment with infrared saunas.

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Our world is changing rapidly

In the whole history of civilizations there has never been a time of such rapid change in the world or humankind. Many of the crises that we are experiencing and living in our world today are due to the many cover-ups and ignorance’s of science and humans as to the true nature of things.

Changes are happening though, finally “Science, Spirituality and Ancients Wisdoms are coming together to show us another way, or should I say the real way that humankind needs to evolve so as to experience our true state of being and the miracles that come with it.

Hundreds of thousands are realizing these miracles and so a shift has started, the planet itself is changing due to this shift. We are starting to truly sense the powers we have within, to create a new world from within out.

The more we know about ourselves and the nature of reality, the more tools we have to begin to make powerful changes in our lives! The key to change is to understand as much as we can about consciousness and the ‘tools’ it uses to develop its self – namely experience via our emotions and feelings. Our consciousness is very aware and notices everything, it observes and pays attention to us. It is aware of our thoughts, our dreams, out behaviors, and our desires. It ‘observes’.

It takes 1billion molecules of energy to make 1 molecule of mass. The understanding, that we are mostly ‘pure energy’ and that our emotions and feelings are the direct communication with that energy, [consciousness], helps us to change and gain control of, what we are creating as our life.

Great individuals know this and are able to transcend the ‘ordinary’ and live from a greater understanding of the power they have to shape the future.

Your environment does not control your thinking, you do! Once you learn the secrets of tapping into the resources within and the living ‘Field’ around us, you become very aware of the future you are able to create.

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Wild Canadian Way Salmon Riceless Sushi

Sockeye Canadian Smoked Salmon is the best smoked salmon in the world. Samantha Rayn Bachman teaches you how to make a smoked salmon ‘rice less’ sushi that will have your taste buds kicking and screaming for more. Enjoy her simple way of making a ‘not rice’ rice by using apple, parsnip, cashews and turnip. Her guest is David Cost-Chretien the owner of Canadian Way.


 

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Microorganisms & Pleomorphism

Microorganisms & Pleomorphism 

Samantha Bachman speaks to a P & C group on the effects of poor nutrition on the normal microorganisms, (micro flora) in the human body. She explains how they metamorph, into harmful organisms and can attack their host – this is also known as an Autoimmune problem. She also explains Pleomorphism in simple term, in short how these microorganisms can morph back.

Samantha Bachman has had over 30 years in the healthcare industry. She now prefers to teach people how to eat well and get away from the disease management model we have become familiar with and take control of our own health via proper diet and lifestyle habits. We are digging our graves with our teeth, it is time to understand what our body really needs and reclaim our health says Samantha.


 

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Raw Eating Facts

Raw Foods are straight from Nature – full of nutrition, fibre, water and taste.

 

Some Questions and Answers on RAW FOODS

What is raw or uncooked food?
Any natural food item which is not cooked or processed by heat can be called raw (or uncooked) food. This includes fruits, nuts, seeds, vegetables, sprouted grains, cereals either in their natural form with minimal processing like cutting, grating or making juices.


Isn’t cooking an important part of modern society?

Yes, man has made it so, without realising that cooking food is an unnatural and destructive process. Different cooking methods destroy the food to varying degrees. If you were to have raw food and juices, then all the nutrients are preserved. The body directly absorbs and assimilates such food very quickly. Such food is very high in pranic energy also.
There’s disadvantages in cooking?

Yes, of course! There are several disadvantages.
Of the various forms of cooking, steaming or boiling seem to be the least harmful. Boiling should be done in minimal of water and the water retained and used. Pressure cooking should be done only for optimum time.

 

Deep frying is the worst form of cooking, as it renders the food almost indigestible.

Modern equipment like inframatic or microwave oven are best avoided. The reason is that they heat up food by setting the molecules of food into vibration. Even after you remove the food from the oven, this process continues for some time. This is likely to damage our gastrointestinal lining, leading to diseases.
However, to cure such diseases requires a whole new approach to life. Patients are therefore advised to seek help from qualified and competent persons.
Changing one’s lifestyle, is just the beginning, including how you cook!

Milk

It has calcium & is known as a complete food. Should we drink milk? This is another peculiar characteristic of man. No other animal drinks milk after infancy, neither does it drink milk of other animals. Whereas man continues to drink cow, buffalo or goat’s milk even after infancy.

The nature of the calcium present in milk is such that is not absorbed by the body. Every time you drink milk or eat meat, your body. Every time you drink milk or eat meat, your body loses calcium regardless of how much calcium you take in. This can result in a decrease in bone density, thus leading to a fatal disease called “osteoporosis”.

So why avoid milk?

After the age of 4 years, he human system is incapable of fully digesting milk. The enzyme renin which helps in the digestion of milk is present only in chidren between the ages of upto 4. Thus adlts will find difficlt to digest milk, and it will create mucus. In England, milk is called “mucus”. Hence people with any problem related to the lungs or sineses should stop having milk and milk products. They will find instant relief. Curd and butter milk are a bit easier to digest than milk.

Over 95% of people are lactose intolerant. Milk contains mainly lactose sguar. Thus drinking milk can lead to alor even diarrhoea. Modern doctors relise these facts. They recomment sprouts and soya-milk as the vegetable souce of calcium, which is vital for the body.

What is Pranic energy? 
Prana shakti or Pranic energy is the universal life-force present in all living things. It is present in varying degrees in the plant kingdom and in raw food.

Are all raw foods good to eat?

No, not necessarily so. Even amongst the raw and natural food, there are different categories as follows:

– Positive prana food: This type of food is abundant in pranic energy vital to the body. All the fruits, nuts, sprouts, greens and most of the vegetables come under this category. Amongst the vegetables, ash gourd is highest in its prana content. Pepper is also high in prana.

– Zero prana food: This type of food does not give any pranic energy to the body. Potatoes and tomatoes come under this category.

– Negative prana foods: This type of food takes away the pranic energy of the body instead of giving energy. It means that they activate the wrong energy channels in the body. The metabolism is incorrect and therefore they deplete the pranic energy. Most of them are nervous stimulants and are known as aphrodisiacs.

The list of negative food (descending order) is non-vegetarian food, fried food, garlic, onion, chilies, asafetida (hing) and bridals.
Other non-food negative prana items are mind altering “drugs, intoxicants like alcohol, stimulants like tobacco, cigarette, coffee, tea and antibiotics.

Negative-prana category includes items used in medicine. How is this discrepency explained?

Nature has provided unique properties in plants and herbs. Certain items may have medicinal value in certain conditions. However, the same should not be used regularly or as a food item. Or else they become an addiction.

For example, we all know that garlic has some medicinal properties, which can prevent heart-trouble. As people get used to its taste, they over-use it as a food item and justify the use. More over, eating proper raw food can itself prevent disease.

Is meat part of man’s natural diet?
No, physiologically our body has been designed for a vegetarian diet. We differ greatly from other carnivores (flesh eating animals).

Please explain the significance of the listed differences between man and carnivores.

It means that man cannot digest meat properly due to the limitations of the body. Man’s intestines are very long and meat will stay inside for a longer time and thus putrify. Man is provided with many molars which are to be used for grinding the fruits and vegetables. Only due to cooking, man is able to soften meat and thus eat it.

The saliva of man contains ptyalin. Ptyalin is an enzyme which digests carbohydrates, present in vegetables and fruits. Meat contains protein and fats, and thus the saliva of carnivores lack ptyalin.

Ecologically and economically, meat is very costly. To produce one meal of meat, it requires 30 times more land than it requires to produce one vegetarian meal. In other words, if a person is having a non-vegetarian meal, he/she is depriving 30 of his/her fellow beings of their food. What a waste!
Man should consider these facts and go back to nature. This will restore health and happiness to one and all.

Disadvantages of cooking!
Cooking destroys prani energy:
Pranic energy is the vital energy or the life-force which energises the living beings. During the process of cooking, a major part of the vital energy is destroyed.
Natural enzymes are destroyed:
Natural food contains several natural enzymes which help the body to digest food easily and quickly. The enzymes are very thermolabile. The rise in temperature during cooking destroys these useful enzymes. As cooked food contains almost no useful enzymes, the body will take longer time to digest. The body is required to device alternate process of digestion. This is stressful to the whole system.
Vitamins are mostly destroyed:
Depending on the degree and duration of cooking, the vitamins are either completely or partially destroyed; vitamin C is particularly heat sensitive. At a temperature above 50 degrees Celsius, it is completely destroyed. Thus cooking increases the chances of vitamin-deficiency and its related symptoms.
Cooked food enhances bacterial growth and toxins:
As cooked food is retained for digestion by the body for a longer time, it becomes a good media for harmful bacteria to grow, multiply and produce toxins.
More quantity required:
Cooked food is low in quality (as prani energy is less). To compensate for this, one is required to eat more quantity of cooked food. It is estimated that man eats almost four times the quantity of cooked food compared to what is necessary if one were to have only raw natural food.
All the above disadvantages are avoided by eating raw food!

Should I start eating raw food from today?
Oh yes! you can start right now. The only thing you have to keep in mind is to shift gradually from eating cooked foods to raw foods. This way you can sustain the change for a longer period of time.
If for two days you have only raw food and switch over to cooked food for the next two days, the digestive system cannot adjust and is not good for health.

How much quantity of raw food should we eat?
Normally, healthy people should have about 50-70% of their total daily food intake as raw food. For someone who is not used to eating raw food, we recommend the following schedule:
(i) First two days, have about 20% of your daily food intake in the form of raw food. Subsequently go on increasing 10% every day.
(ii) By this method, you can be on 50% of raw foods within 5 days. Continue having 50-70% raw food as part of your daily routine.
(iii) Once or twice in a month, you can do a “raw food fast” ie. have 100% raw food or juices for the whole day. This way, the system gets rests and is also cleansed
(iv) Do some light exercises along with this schedule. This will help you utilize the energy.

Will the raw food make me weak or thin? Are there any side-effects?
No, in fact you can be strong and healthy. Initially, a few people may have diarrhoea or constipation. But this is only a sign of the body releasing toxins or adjusting to the “new” type of food.

What about my taste-buds? Will they not suffer at this rate?
You can make very delicious mouth-watering dishes with raw food as well.
Right now, due to abuse of spices and cooked food, the taste buds have become insensitive. So initially, some people may experience eating raw food as similar to hewing grass! As you continue to eat raw food, your taste-buds will also grow more sensitive. Then only you will discover the subtle sweetness and mellow taste of raw food.

Doctors & nutritionists mention the acid-alkaline balance of food. What does that mean?
The human body consists of various organs and parts which in turn consist of tissues and cells. These tissues and cells consist of 16 chemical elements. The balance of these chemical elements in the body is very vital for maintaining good health. This is known as the acid-alkaline balance.
All foods, after their absorption in the body, leave behind either an acidic or an alkaline residue. The normal body chemistry is approximately 20% acidic and 80% alkaline. This is the acid-alkaline balance for optimum health and well being.
Whenever the alkalinity of the blood reduces even slightly acids start accumulating in the tissues. This condition is known as acidosis or hypo-alkalinity of blood.
Most diseases including indigestion, headache, nervous disorders, rheumatism, blood pressure, skin disorders etc are because of acidosis.

What is the main cause of acidosis?
The main cause of acidosis is a faulty diet. When the diet consists of too many acid-forming food and these acid are not properly eliminated though the lungs, kidneys and bowels alkalinity of blood reduces and acidosis increases.
The other causes of acidosis are depletion of alkali reserve due to diarrhoea, dysentery, cholera etc., accumulation of acetone bodies resulting from starvation, vomiting and diabetes.

How does one prevent acidosis?
Acidosis can be prevented by maintaining a proper balance between the acid and alkaline food in the diet. This food leaves an alkaline residue and increases the alkalinity of the blood, while the food which leaves an acidic residue reduces the alkalinity of the blood. Thus our daily diet should have 20% of acid producing food and 80% of alkaline producing food.
The effect of food-stuff upon the alkalinity of blood depends upon the residue they leave behind after undergoing oxidation in the body. It does not depend upon taste, eg. lime and citrus fruits taste acidic but after being absorbed in the body they leave an alkaline residue.
The following chart shows the common food with acid and alkaline residues.
FOOD WHICH LEAVES AN ALKALINE RESIDUE INCLUDE:
Almonds; apples; apricots; banana (ripe); beet; cabbage; carrot; cauliflower; coconut; cottage cheese; cucumber; dates; figs; grapes; limes; lettuce; melons; milk; oranges; peaches; pears; pineapple; potato; pumpkin; radish; raisins; spinach; soybean; tomato; turnip
FOOD HIGH IN ACID RESIDUE INCLUDE:
Meat; sea-food; eggs; banana (unripe); tea; coffee
FOOD MODERATE ON ACID RESIDUE INCLUDE:
Nuts (except almonds); rice; beans; cereals and grains; bread; biscuits; pastries; plums; prunes; sugar

“For imparting vitality and building up resistance to disease, raw juices have
no equal and should be part of the daily diet of young and old alike.” LAWRENCE ARMSTRONG – Famous Australian Food Scientist
The value of a fruit diet cannot be underestimated especially in sickness,
ill-health or whenever the body is filled with toxins.

ALKALINE & ACID FORMING FOODS
Human blood pH should be slightly alkaline ( 7.35 – 7.45 ).
Below or above this range means symptoms and disease.
A pH of 7.0 is neutral.
A pH below 7.0 is acidic.
A pH above 7.0 is alkaline.
The pH scale is from   0 – 14
0 1 2  3  4  5  6  7 healthy  8 9 10 11 12 13 14
An acidic pH can occur from, an acid forming diet, emotional stress, toxic overload, and/or immune reactions or any process that deprives the cells of oxygen and other nutrients.  The body will try to compensate for acidic pH by using alkaline minerals.  If the diet does not contain enough minerals to compensate, a build up of acids in the cells will occur.

An acidic balance will:  decrease the body’s ability to absorb minerals and other nutrients, decrease the energy production in the cells, decrease it’s ability to repair damaged cells, decrease it’s ability to detoxify heavy metals, make tumor cells thrive, and make it more susceptible to fatigue and illness.  A blood pH of 6.9, which is only slightly acidic, can induce coma and death.

The reason acidosis is more common in our society is mostly due to the typical American diet, which is far too high in acid producing animal products like meat, eggs and dairy, and far too low in alkaline producing foods like fresh vegetables.  Additionally, we eat acid producing processed foods like white flour and sugar and drink acid producing beverages like coffee and soft drinks.  We use too many drugs, which are acid forming; and we use artificial chemical sweeteners like NutraSweet, Spoonful, Sweet ‘N Low, Equal, or Aspartame, which are poison and extremely acid forming.  One of the best things we can do to correct an overly acid body is to clean up the diet and lifestyle.

To maintain health, the diet should consist of 60% alkaline forming foods and 40% acid forming foods.  To restore health, the diet should consist of 80% alkaline forming foods and 20% acid forming foods.

Generally, alkaline forming foods include: most fruits, green vegetables, peas, beans, lentils, spices, herbs and seasonings, and seeds and nuts.

Generally, acid forming foods include: meat, fish, poultry, eggs, grains, and legumes.

Shifting Your pH Toward Alkaline
The chart below is for those trying to “adjust” their body pH.  The pH scale is from 0 to 14, with numbers below 7 acidic ( low on oxygen ) and numbers above 7 alkaline.  An acidic body is a sickness magnet.  What you eat and drink will impact where your body’s pH level falls.  Balance is Key.

ALKALINE FOODS ALKALIZING VEGETABLES
Alfalfa
Barley Grass
Beet Greens
Beets
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celery
Chard Greens
Chlorella
Collard Greens
Cucumber
Dandelions
Dulce
Edible Flowers
Eggplant
Fermented Veggies
Garlic
Green Beans
Green Peas Kale
Kohlrabi
Lettuce Mushrooms
Mustard Greens
Nightshade Veggies
Onions
Parsnips (high glycemic)
Peas
Peppers
Pumpkin
Radishes
Rutabaga
Sea Veggies
Spinach, green
Spirulina
Sprouts
Sweet Potatoes
Tomatoes
Watercress
Wheat Grass
Wild Greens
ALKALIZING ORIENTAL VEGETABLES
Daikon
Dandelion Root
Kombu
Maitake
Nori
Reishi
Shitake
Umeboshi
Wakame
ALKALIZING FRUITS
Apple
Apricot
Avocado
Banana (high glycemic)
Berries
Blackberries
Cantaloupe
Cherries, sour
Coconut, fresh
Currants
Dates, dried
Figs, dried
Grapes
Grapefruit
Honeydew Melon
Lemon Lime
Muskmelons
Nectarine
Orange
Peach
Pear
Pineapple
Raisins
Raspberries
Rhubarb
Strawberries
Tangerine
Tomato
Tropical Fruits
Umeboshi Plums
Watermelon
ALKALIZING PROTEIN
Almonds
Chestnuts
Millet Tempeh (fermented)
Tofu (fermented)
Whey Protein Powder
ALKALIZING SWEETENERS
Stevia
ALKALIZING SPICES & SEASONINGS
Chili Pepper
Cinnamon
Curry
Ginger
Herbs (all) Miso
Mustard
Sea Salt
Tamari
ALKALIZING OTHER
Alkaline Antioxidant Water
Apple Cider Vinegar
Bee Pollen
Fresh Fruit Juice
Green Juices
Lecithin Granules Mineral Water
Molasses, blackstrap
Probiotic Cultures
Soured Dairy Products
Veggie Juices
ALKALIZING MINERALS
Calcium: pH 12
Cesium: pH 14
Magnesium: pH 9 Potassium: pH 14
Sodium: pH 14 Although it might seem that citrus fruits would have an acidifying effect on the body, the citric acid they contain actually has an alkalinizing effect in the system.

Note that a food’s acid or alkaline forming tendency in the body has nothing to do with the actual pH of the food itself. For example, lemons are very acidic, however the end products they produce after digestion and assimilation are very alkaline so, lemons are alkaline forming in the body. Likewise, meat will test alkaline before digestion, but it leaves very acidic residue in the body so, like nearly all animal products, meat is very acid forming.
ACIDIC FOODS ACIDIFYING VEGETABLES
Corn
Lentils
Olives
Winter Squash
ACIDIFYING FRUITS
Blueberries
Canned or Glazed Fruits
Cranberries Currants
Plums**
Prunes**
ACIDIFYING GRAINS, GRAIN PRODUCTS
Amaranth
Barley
Bran, oat
Bran, wheat
Bread
Corn
Cornstarch
Crackers, soda
Flour, wheat
Flour, white
Hemp Seed Flour
Kamut Macaroni
Noodles
Oatmeal
Oats (rolled)
Quinoa
Rice (all)
Rice Cakes
Rye
Spaghetti
Spelt
Wheat Germ
Wheat
ACIDIFYING BEANS & LEGUMES
Almond Milk
Black Beans
Chick Peas
Green Peas
Kidney Beans
Lentils Pinto Beans
Red Beans
Rice Milk
Soy Beans
Soy Milk
White Beans
ACIDIFYING DAIRY
Butter
Cheese
Cheese, Processed Ice Cream
Ice Milk
ACIDIFYING NUTS & BUTTERS
Cashews
Legumes
Peanut Butter
Peanuts Pecans
Tahini
Walnuts
ACIDIFYING ANIMAL PROTEIN
Bacon
Beef
Carp
Clams
Cod
Corned Beef
Fish
Haddock
Lamb
Lobster
Mussels
Organ Meats
Oyster Pike
Pork
Rabbit
Salmon
Sardines
Sausage
Scallops
Shellfish
Shrimp
Tuna
Turkey
Veal
Venison
ACIDIFYING FATS & OILS
Avacado Oil
Butter
Canola Oil
Corn Oil
Flax Oil
Hemp Seed Oil Lard
Olive Oil
Safflower Oil
Sesame Oil
Sunflower Oil
ACIDIFYING SWEETENERS
Carob
Corn Syrup
Sugar
ACIDIFYING ALCOHOL
Beer
Hard Liquor Spirits
Wine
ACIDIFYING OTHER FOODS
Catsup
Cocoa
Coffee
Mustard Pepper
Soft Drinks
Vinegar
ACIDIFYING DRUGS & CHEMICALS
Aspirin
Chemicals
Drugs, Medicinal
Drugs, Psychedelic Herbicides
Pesticides
Tobacco
ACIDIFYING JUNK FOOD
Beer: pH 2.5
Coca-Cola: pH 2
Coffee: pH 4
** These foods leave an alkaline ash but have an acidifying effect on the body.
UNKNOWN The following foods are sometimes attributed to the Acidic side of the chart and sometimes to the Alkaline side.  Remember, you don’t need to adhere strictly to the Alkaline side of the chart, just make sure a good percentage of the foods you eat come from that side. Brazil Nuts
Brussel Sprouts
Buckwheat
Cashews
Chicken
Corn
Cottage Cheese
Eggs
Flax Seeds
Green Tea
Herbal Tea
Honey
Kombucha
Lima Beans Maple Syrup
Milk
Nuts
Organic Milk (unpasteurized)
Potatoes, white
Pumpkin Seeds
Quinoa
Sauerkraut
Soy Products
Sprouted Seeds
Squashes
Sunflower Seeds
Tomatoes
Yogurt
* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; research is ongoing.

Ranked Foods: Alkaline  to  Acidic Highly Alkaline

Baking soda, sea salt, mineral water, pumpkin seed, lentils, seaweed, onion, taro root, sea vegetables, lotus root, sweet potato, lime, lemons, nectarine, persimmon, raspberry, watermelon, tangerine, and pineapple.

Extremely Alkaline
Lemons, watermelon.

Alkaline
Cantaloupe, cayenne celery, dates, figs, kelp, limes, mango, melons, papaya, parsley, seaweeds, seedless grapes (sweet), watercress, asparagus, fruit juices, grapes (sweet), kiwifruit, passionfruit, pears (sweet), pineapple, raisins, umeboshi plums, and vegetable juices.

Moderately Alkaline
Apples (sweet), alfalfa sprouts, apricots, avocados, bananas (ripe), currants, dates, figs (fresh), garlic, grapefruit, grapes (less sweet), guavas, herbs (leafy green), lettuce (leafy green), nectarine, peaches (sweet), pears (less sweet), peas (fresh, sweet), pumpkin (sweet), sea salt (vegetable), apples (sour), beans (fresh, green), beets, bell peppers, broccoli, cabbage, carob, cauliflower, ginger (fresh), grapes (sour), lettuce (pale green), oranges, peaches (less sweet), peas (less sweet), potatoes (with skin), pumpkin (less sweet), raspberries, strawberries, squash, sweet Corn (fresh), turnip, vinegar (apple cider), apricots, spices, kambucha, unsulfured molasses, soy sauce, cashews, chestnuts, pepper, kohlrabi, parsnip, garlic, asparagus, kale, parsley, endive, arugula, mustard green, ginger root, broccoli, grapefruit, cantaloupe, honeydew, citrus, olive, dewberry, carrots, loganberry, and mango.

Low Alkaline
Most herbs, green tea, mu tea, rice syrup, apple cider vinegar, sake, quail eggs, primrose oil, sesame seed, cod liver oil, almonds, sprouts, potato, bell pepper, mushrooms, cauliflower, cabbage, rutabaga, ginseng, eggplant, pumpkin, collard green, pear, avocado, apples (sour), blackberry, cherry, peach, and papaya.

Very Low Alkaline
Almonds, artichokes (jerusalem), brussel sprouts, cherries, coconut (fresh), cucumbers, eggplant, honey (raw), leeks, mushrooms, okra, olives (ripe), onions, pickles (homemade), radishes, sea salt, spices, tomatoes (sweet), vinegar (sweet brown rice), chestnuts (dry, roasted), egg yolks (soft cooked), essene bread, goat’s milk and whey (raw), mayonnaise (homemade), olive oil, sesame seeds (whole), soy beans (dry), soy cheese, soy milk, sprouted grains, tofu, tomatoes (less sweet), and yeast (nutritional flakes), ginger tea, umeboshi vinegar, ghee, duck eggs, oats, grain coffee, quinoa, japonica rice, wild rice, avocado oil, most seeds, coconut oil, olive oil, flax oil, brussel sprout, beet, chive, cilantro, celery, okra, cucumber, turnip greens, squashes, lettuces, orange, banana, blueberry, raisin, currant, grape, and strawberry.

Neutral
Butter (fresh, unsalted), cream (fresh, raw), cow’s milk and whey (raw), margine, oils (except olive), and yogurt (plain).

Very Low Acid
Curry, koma coffee, honey, maple syrup, vinegar, cream, butter, goat/sheep cheese, chicken, gelatin, organs, venison, fish, wild duck, triticale, millet, kasha, amaranth, brown rice, pumpkin seed oil, grape seed oil, sunflower oil, pine nuts, canola oil, spinach, fava beans, black-eyed peas, string beans, wax beans, zucchini, chutney, rhubarb, coconut, guava, dry fruit, figs, and dates.

Low Acid
Vanilla, alcohol, black tea, balsamic vinegar, cow milk, aged cheese, soy cheese, goat milk, game meat, lamb, mutton, boar, elk, shell fish, mollusks, goose, turkey, buckwheat, wheat, spelt, teff, kamut, farina, semolina, white rice, almond oil, sesame oil, safflower oil, tapioca, seitan, tofu, pinto beans, white beans, navy beans, red beans, aduki beans, lima beans, chard, plum, prune and tomatoes.

Moderately Acidic
Bananas (green), barley (rye), blueberries, bran, butter, cereals (unrefined), cheeses, crackers (unrefined rye, rice and wheat), cranberries, dried beans (mung, adzuki, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), dry coconut, egg whites, eggs whole (cooked hard), fructose, goat’s milk (homogenized), honey (pasteurized), ketchup, maple syrup (unprocessed), milk (homogenized), molasses (unsulferd and organic), most nuts, mustard, oats (rye, organic), olives (pickled), pasta (whole grain), pastry (whole grain and honey), plums, popcorn (with salt and/or butter), potatoes, prunes, rice (basmati and brown), seeds (pumpkin, sunflower), soy sauce, and wheat bread (sprouted organic), nutmeg, coffee, casein, milk protein, cottage cheese, soy milk, pork, veal, bear, mussels, squid, chicken, maize, barley groats, corn, rye, oat bran, pistachio seeds, chestnut oil, lard, pecans, palm kernel oil, green peas, peanuts, snow peas, other legumes, garbanzo beans, cranberry, and pomegranate.

Extremely Acidic
Artificial sweeteners, beef, beer, breads, brown sugar, carbonated soft drinks, cereals (refined), chocolate, cigarettes and tobacco, coffee, cream of wheat (unrefined), custard (with white sugar), deer, drugs, fish, flour (white, wheat), fruit juices with sugar, jams, jellies, lamb, liquor, maple syrup (processed), molasses (sulphured), pasta (white), pastries and cakes from white flour, pickles (commercial), pork, poultry, seafood, sugar (white), table salt (refined and iodized), tea (black), white bread, white vinegar (processed), whole wheat foods, wine, and yogurt (sweetened).

Highly Acid
Tabletop sweeteners like (NutraSweet, Spoonful, Sweet ‘N Low, Equal or Aspartame), pudding, jam, jelly, table salt (NaCl), beer, yeast, hops, malt, sugar, cocoa, white (acetic acid) vinegar, processed cheese, ice cream, beef, lobster, pheasant, barley, cottonseed oil, hazelnuts, walnuts, brazil nuts, fried foods, soybean, and soft drinks, especially the cola type.  To neutralize a glass of cola with a pH of 2.5, it would take 32 glasses of alkaline water with a pH of 10.

Some Questions on RAW FACTS

What is raw or uncooked food?
Any natural food item which is not cooked or processed
by heat can be called raw (or uncooked) food. This includes fruits, nuts, seeds,
vegetables, sprouted grains, cereals either in their natural form with minimal
processing like cutting, grating or making juices.

Isn’t cooking an important part of modern
society?
Yes, man has made it so, without realising that cooking
food is an unnatural and destructive process. Different cooking methods destroy
the food to varying degrees. If you were to have raw food and juices, then all
the nutrients are preserved. The body directly absorbs and assimilates such food
very quickly. Such food is very high in pranic energy
also.

There’s disadvantages in
cooking?
Yes, of course! There are several
disadvantages.
Of the various forms of cooking, steaming or boiling seem to
be the least harmful. Boiling should be done in minimal of water and the water
retained and used. Pressure cooking should be done only for optimum time. Deep
frying is the worst form of cooking, as it renders the food almost indigestible.

Modern equipment like inframatic or microwave oven are best avoided. The
reason is that they heat up food by setting the molecules of food into
vibration. Even after you remove the food from the oven, this process continues
for some time. This is likely to damage our gastrointestinal lining, leading to
diseases.
However, to cure such diseases requires a whole new approach to
life. Patients are therefore advised to seek help from qualified and competent
persons.
Changing one’s lifestyle, is just the beginning, including how you
cook!

Milk – it has calcium & is known as
a complete food. Should we drink milk?
This is another
peculiar characteristic of man. No other animal drinks milk after infancy,
neither does it drink milk of other animals. Whereas man continues to drink cow,
buffalo or goat’s milk even after infancy.
The nature of the calcium present
in milk is such that is not absorbed by the body. Every time you drink milk or
eat meat, your body. Every time you drink milk or eat meat, your body loses
calcium regardless of how much calcium you take in. This can result in a
decrease in bone density, thus leading to a fatal disease called
“osteoporosis”.

So why avoid
milk?
After the age of 4 years, he human system is incapable of
fully digesting milk. The enzyme renin which helps in the digestion of milk is
present only in chidren between the ages of upto 4. Thus adlts will find
difficlt to digest milk, and it will create mucus. In England, milk is called
“mucus”. Hence people with any problem related to the lungs or sineses should
stop having milk and milk products. They will find instant relief. Curd and
butter milk are a bit easier to digest than milk.
Over 95% of people are
lactose intolerant. Milk contains mainly lactose sguar. Thus drinking milk can
lead to alor even diarrhoea. Modern doctors relise these facts. They recomment
sprouts and soya-milk as the vegetable souce of calcium, which is vital for the
body.

What is Pranic energy?

Prana shakti or Pranic energy is the universal life-force
present in all living things. It is present in varying degrees in the plant
kingdom and in raw food.

Are all raw foods
good to eat?
No, not necessarily so. Even amongst the
raw and natural food, there are different categories as follows:

Positive prana food: This type of food is abundant in
pranic energy vital to the body. All the fruits, nuts, sprouts, greens and most
of the vegetables come under this category. Amongst the vegetables, ash gourd is
highest in its prana content. Pepper is also high in prana.
Zero
prana food: This type of food does not give any pranic energy to the
body. Potatoes and tomatoes come under this category.
Negative prana
foods: This type of food takes away the pranic energy of the body
instead of giving energy. It means that they activate the wrong energy channels
in the body. The metabolism is incorrect and therefore they deplete the pranic
energy. Most of them are nervous stimulants and are known as
aphrodisiacs.
The list of negative food (descending order) is non-vegetarian
food, fried food, garlic, onion, chilies, asafetida (hing) and bridals.
Other
non-food negative prana items are mind altering “drugs, intoxicants like
alcohol, stimulants like tobacco, cigarette, coffee, tea and
antibiotics.

Negative-prana category includes items
used in medicine. How is this discrepency explained?

Nature has provided unique properties in plants and herbs.
Certain items may have medicinal value in certain conditions. However, the same
should not be used regularly or as a food item. Or else they become an
addiction.
For example, we all know that garlic has some medicinal
properties, which can prevent heart-trouble. As people get used to its taste,
they over-use it as a food item and justify the use. More over, eating proper
raw food can itself prevent disease.

Is meat part
of man’s natural diet?
No, physiologically our body
has been designed for a vegetarian diet. We differ greatly from other carnivores
(flesh eating animals).

Please explain the
significance of the listed differences between man and carnivores.

It means that man cannot digest meat properly due to the
limitations of the body. Man’s intestines are very long and meat will stay
inside for a longer time and thus putrify. Man is provided with many molars
which are to be used for grinding the fruits and vegetables. Only due to
cooking, man is able to soften meat and thus eat it.
The saliva of man
contains ptyalin. Ptyalin is an enzyme which digests carbohydrates, present in
vegetables and fruits. Meat contains protein and fats, and thus the saliva of
carnivores lack ptyalin.
Ecologically and economically, meat is very costly.
To produce one meal of meat, it requires 30 times more land than it requires to
produce one vegetarian meal. In other words, if a person is having a
non-vegetarian meal, he/she is depriving 30 of his/her fellow beings of their
food. What a waste!
Man should consider these facts and go back to nature.
This will restore health and happiness to one and
all.

Disadvantages of cooking!
Cooking destroys prani energy:
Pranic
energy is the vital energy or the life-force which energises the living beings.
During the process of cooking, a major part of the vital energy is destroyed.

Natural enzymes are destroyed:
Natural food contains
several natural enzymes which help the body to digest food easily and quickly.
The enzymes are very thermolabile. The rise in temperature during cooking
destroys these useful enzymes. As cooked food contains almost no useful enzymes,
the body will take longer time to digest. The body is required to device
alternate process of digestion. This is stressful to the whole system.

Vitamins are mostly destroyed:
Depending on the degree
and duration of cooking, the vitamins are either completely or partially
destroyed; vitamin C is particularly heat sensitive. At a temperature above 50
degrees Celsius, it is completely destroyed. Thus cooking increases the chances
of vitamin-deficiency and its related symptoms.
Cooked food enhances
bacterial growth and toxins:
As cooked food is retained for
digestion by the body for a longer time, it becomes a good media for harmful
bacteria to grow, multiply and produce toxins.
More quantity
required:
Cooked food is low in quality (as prani energy is less).
To compensate for this, one is required to eat more quantity of cooked food. It
is estimated that man eats almost four times the quantity of cooked food
compared to what is necessary if one were to have only raw natural
food.
All the above disadvantages are avoided by eating raw
food!

Should I start eating raw food
from today?
Oh yes! you can start right now. The only
thing you have to keep in mind is to shift gradually from eating cooked foods to
raw foods. This way you can sustain the change for a longer period of time.

If for two days you have only raw food and switch over to cooked food for
the next two days, the digestive system cannot adjust and is not good for
health.

How much quantity of raw food should
we eat?
Normally, healthy people should have about
50-70% of their total daily food intake as raw food. For someone who is not used
to eating raw food, we recommend the following schedule:
(i) First two days,
have about 20% of your daily food intake in the form of raw food. Subsequently
go on increasing 10% every day.
(ii) By this method, you can be on 50% of raw
foods within 5 days. Continue having 50-70% raw food as part of your daily
routine.
(iii) Once or twice in a month, you can do a “raw food fast” ie.
have 100% raw food or juices for the whole day. This way, the system gets rests
and is also cleansed
(iv) Do some light exercises along with this schedule.
This will help you utilize the energy.

Will the raw food make me weak or thin? Are there any side-effects?

No, in fact you can be strong and healthy. Initially, a few
people may have diarrhoea or constipation. But this is only a sign of the body
releasing toxins or adjusting to the “new” type of food.

What about my taste-buds? Will they not
suffer at this rate?
You can make very delicious
mouth-watering dishes with raw food as well.
Right now, due to abuse of
spices and cooked food, the taste buds have become insensitive. So initially,
some people may experience eating raw food as similar to hewing grass! As you
continue to eat raw food, your taste-buds will also grow more sensitive. Then
only you will discover the subtle sweetness and mellow taste of raw food.

Doctors & nutritionists mention the
acid-alkaline balance of food. What does that mean?

The human body consists of various organs and parts which in
turn consist of tissues and cells. These tissues and cells consist of 16
chemical elements. The balance of these chemical elements in the body is very
vital for maintaining good health. This is known as the acid-alkaline balance.

All foods, after their absorption in the body, leave behind either an acidic
or an alkaline residue. The normal body chemistry is approximately 20% acidic
and 80% alkaline. This is the acid-alkaline balance for optimum health and well
being.
Whenever the alkalinity of the blood reduces even slightly acids start
accumulating in the tissues. This condition is known as acidosis or
hypo-alkalinity of blood.
Most diseases including indigestion, headache,
nervous disorders, rheumatism, blood pressure, skin disorders etc are because of
acidosis.

What is the main cause of
acidosis?
The main cause of acidosis is a faulty diet.
When the diet consists of too many acid-forming food and these acid are not
properly eliminated though the lungs, kidneys and bowels alkalinity of blood
reduces and acidosis increases.
The other causes of acidosis are depletion
of alkali reserve due to diarrhoea, dysentery, cholera etc., accumulation of
acetone bodies resulting from starvation, vomiting and diabetes.

How dos one prevent
acidosis?
Acidosis can be prevented by maintaining a
proper balance between the acid and alkaline food in the diet. This food leaves
an alkaline residue and increases the alkalinity of the blood, while the food
which leaves an acidic residue reduces the alkalinity of the blood. Thus our
daily diet should have 20% of acid producing food and 80% of alkaline producing
food.
The effect of food-stuff upon the alkalinity of blood depends upon the
residue they leave behind after undergoing oxidation in the body. It does not
depend upon taste, eg. lime and citrus fruits taste acidic but after being
absorbed in the body they leave an alkaline residue.
The following chart
shows the common food with acid and alkaline residues.

FOOD WHICH LEAVES AN ALKALINE RESIDUE INCLUDE:

Almonds; apples; apricots; banana (ripe); beet;
cabbage; carrot; cauliflower; coconut; cottage cheese; cucumber; dates; figs;
grapes; limes; lettuce; melons; milk; oranges; peaches; pears; pineapple;
potato; pumpkin; radish; raisins; spinach; soybean; tomato;
turnip
FOOD HIGH IN ACID RESIDUE INCLUDE:

Meat; sea-food; eggs; banana (unripe); tea;
coffee
FOOD MODERATE ON ACID RESIDUE INCLUDE:

Nuts (except almonds); rice; beans; cereals and
grains; bread; biscuits; pastries; plums; prunes;
sugar

For imparting vitality and
building up resistance to disease, raw juices have
no equal and should be
part of the daily diet of young and old alike.” LAWRENCE ARMSTRONG – Famous
Australian Food Scientist
The value of a fruit diet cannot be underestimated
especially in sickness,
ill-health or whenever the body is filled with
toxins.

ACIDITY: ashgourd,
orange, beetroot, apple and cucumber

ACNE: peaches,
pineapple, grape fruit, grapes, pears, cucumber, carrot, apple and all fruits
containing niacin and vitamins A and E.

ALCOHOLISM:
apple, celery, orange are the best. All other fruit and vegetables juices are
good too.

ALLERGIES: carrot, grapes and all other
fruits. Adequate intake of vitamins C, E and in certain cases vitamin Bs is
recommended.

ANEMIA: beetroot, cabbage, carrot, celery,
tomato, spinach, apple, cherries, berries, pomegranate, grapes, raisins, figs,
dates, peaches; vitamin B12 is a must for prevention and cure of anemia. The
whole range of vitamin B & C is also vital.

APPENDICITIS: Carrot juice in combination with beetroot
and cucumber juice is very good. Fenugreek seeds tea. Other fresh fruits and
green leafy vegetables. Well-balanced diet of seeds, nuts, grains, fruits and
vegetables.

ARTERIOSCLEROSIS: Grape fruit, pineapple,
lemon, carrot and juices of green leafy vegetables. Vitamin C is very helpful
too. Diet of seeds, nuts, grains and plenty of raw vegetables and fruits.

ARTHRITIS: juices extracted from green leafy
vegetables, spinach mixed with carrot, celery and beetroot. Fresh pineapple and
lime juice, Fresh potato juice mixed 1:1 with water in the morning is also
beneficial.

ASTHMA: honey, carrot, spinach, celery,
raisins, apricot, pineapple, lemon, orange, pears or peaches. Avoid banana and
jack-fruit.

BACK-ACHE: Salad of raw vegetables; tomato,
carrot, cabbage, cucumber, radish, lettuce and all fruits, except banana.
Protein, vitamins C & D, calcium and phosphorous are also helpful.

BRONCHITIS: juice of orange (in warm water especially
when attack is acute). All fruits are good except jack-fruit and banana.

BILIOUSNESS: celery, apple, tomato, carrot, parsley,
lemon, raspberry, or plum juices are helpful.

BOILS &
CARBUNCLES : carrot and spinach, carrot and cucumber,
orange,grape-fruit, spinach, turnip juices are recommended.

CANCER: carrot, grapes, raisins. Complete 100% carrot
or grape juice diet is highly recommended and claims to cure cancer completely.
Johanna Brandt in her book “The grape cure” describes how grapes cure her
complete of her nine-year battle with cancer.

CATARACT:
orange juice with water. Grapes and all seasonal fruits. Sesame is particularly
useful. Vitamins B, C, D, E are particularly helpful.

CIRRHOSIS
OF THE LIVER: beetroot, lemon, papaya, grapes, apple, pears, grape
fruit, orange, pineapple, peaches. Use of salt should be restricted.

COLITIS: carrot juice is the best. Pears, pineapple,
papaya, ripe banana and raw cabbage are also good. Citrus fruit juices should be
avoided. Juices can be diluted with a little boiled water.

COLD:
juices of apple, pears, grapes, grape fruit, orange, pineapple,
peaches, melon. Banana and jack fruit should be avoided. CONJUNCTIVITIS:
apple, orange, pears, grape fruit, grapes, pineapple, carrot, banana to
be voided. Vitamins A & B2 are valuable for the treatment of conjunctivitis.

CONSTIPATION: all fruits except jack-fruit and banana.
Most helpful fruits are grapes, mango, grape-fruit, pears, figs, orange, goose
berries. Dry fruits are also good. Green leafy vegetables like spinach, french
beans, carrot, lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, turnip, beetroot are most
helpful. Alfalfa and moong sprouts are also good.

COUGH: carrot, spinach, blackberry, grape fruit, lemon
or pineapple juices or fruits.

DANDRUFF: apple, pears,
grapes, grape fruit, pineapple and peaches are good.

DEFECTIVE
VISION : all foods containing vitamin A. Raw spinach, turnip tops,
paneer, butter, lettuce, carrot, cabbage, orange, dates, wheat germ, soya bean,
green peas and fresh fruits are recommended.

DEPRESSION: plenty of fresh fruits, green vegetables
and sprouts, alfalfa and moong, cottage cheese and butter milk are also useful.

DIABETES: spring beans, celery, cucumber, bitter gourd,
jambul fruit (the seed can be dried and powered and taken with curd or water),
citrus fruits, and green leafy vegetables.

DIARRHOEA:
in case of acute symptoms, complete fasting is best for a day or two. Gradually
juices of fruits and carrot juice and soups to be taken. Other juices are
pomegranate, spinach, ripe banana and orange in case of chronic diarrhoea.

DYSENTERY: orange juice and butter milk in acute
dysentery. Gradually other fruit juices are taken, Ripe banana pomegranate,
lemon, pineapple, celery, spinach or parsley.

ECZEMA:
ashgourd, carrot and spinach juice combination is best in 3:2 ratio. Cucumber,
orange, strawberry, watercress and raisins.

EPILESPY:
fresh juicy fruits such as apple, orange, grapes, grape fruit, peaches, pears,
pine-apple, melon. Sprouts such as alfalfa, moong taken uncooked are very good.

EYE WEAKNESS : refer Defective
Vision

HAIR LOSS : lettuce, spinach, juice of fresh
alfalfa leaves and carrots are very useful.

FEVER:
juice of bottle gourd, parsley, orange, grape fruit, raisins, blackberry and
raspberry.

GALL-STONES: beetroot, carrots, radish,
parsley, grapefruit, apple, apricot, watercress, lemon can be taken as juices or
fruits.

GASTRITIS: fasting for 2 days in acute cases.
For chronic cases, juices of apple, pears, grapes, grape fruit, orange,
pineapple, peaches and melon. Gradually take nuts, grains and
seeds.

GLAUCOMA: emphasis on vitamin C rich food, fresh
juices of orange, grapes, lemon and other fruits.

GOUT:
cherry, celery, carrot, spinach, beetroot, apple or grapefruit juices.

GOITER: spinach, radish, lettuce, watercress, or
pineapple juices. HALITOSIS (BAD BREATH) : parsley is best,
apple, grape fruit, lemon, pineapple, grapes and carrot are also good.

HEADACHES: celery, parsley, spinach, lettuce, carrot an
juices of citrus fruits.

HEART DISEASE : fresh juice
especially apple, orange, pineapple. Custard apple, pomegranate, grapes, carrot,
beetroot, goose berry or amla and coconut water. Sunflower and safflower seed
sprouts are very beneficial too.

HIGH BLOOD
CHOLESTEROL: diet should be high in fibre, oat bran, whole cereals,
carrot, beet, turnip, mango, guava, green vegetable juices with lettuce, celery
and cabbage.

HYDROCELE: fresh fruit juices including
apple, lemon, pears, grapes, grape fruit, orange, pineapple, peaches, melon and
other juicy fruits. No banana or tinned
fruits

HYPOGLYCEMIA: fresh fruits or juices of apple,
apricot, peaches, avocado, berries, and melon. Too much of citrus fruits to be
avoided. Vegetables which can be taken are asparagus, beetroot, carrot,
cucumber, radish, spinach, lettuce and beans.

INSOMNIA:
lettuce, celery, grape fruit, or apple juices especially in the night before
sleeping.

INFLUENZA: tulsi leaves, fresh fruit juices
including orange, lemon and fresh vegetable juices of carrot and spinach.

JAUNDICE: fresh fruit juices of sugar cane, orange,
lemon, grapes, pears, carrot, beetroot and spinach juices can be taken.
Gradually a simple diet.

KIDNEY & BLADDER TROUBLES:
avoid completely salt, vegetables and fruits containing oxalates. Whole wheat
flour, bengal gram, peas, soya, spinach, cauliflower, turnip, almonds and
coconut. Fruits and vegetables which can be taken are asparagus, cucumber,
parsley, peas, water-cress, turnip leaf, beetroot, pumpkin, lemon, grapes,
pineapple, peaches, pears, papaya and apple.

LEUCODERMA: fresh fruits, raw food, fresh vegetables
are extremely beneficial.

LUMBAGO: juices of celery,
cucumber, blackberry, beetroot are good.

LEUCORRHOEA:
plenty of fresh fruit juices of apple, pear, grapes, grape fruit, pineapple,
orange and peaches; fenugreek seeds also help.

MALARIA:
grape fruit, carrot, spinach, celery and parsley juices can be taken
liberally.

MENSTRUAL CRAMPS : blackberry, raspberry,
raisin juices are helpful

MENSTRUAL DISORDERS : fresh
fruits including apple, prunes, grapes, papaya, banana, beet root, pineapple,
parsley and celery juices are good.

MENOPAUSAL PROBLEMS
: plenty of fruit juices, and a vitamin E rich diet. This can be
obtained from seasame seeds and sprouts. Beetroot juice is also very useful and
should be taken in small quantities diluted with equal quantity of water.

NEPHRITIS: carrot juice with honey is best. Fruits like
apple, grapes, orange, pears, peaches, pineapple can be taken. Plenty of raw
vegetables and a low protein diet is recommended. NERVOUS DISORDERS
: juice of ashgourd is extremely beneficial. Lettuce, carrot, radish,
dandelion, spinach, cucumber, apple, grape and beetroot juices are also very
useful.

OBESITY: cabbage, spinach, beetroot, carrot,
lettuce can be taken as juices or as raw food. Fruits and fruit juices which are
beneficial are pineapple, grape fruit, orange, lemon, strawberry, apricot, plum,
peach, papaya, raisins and pomegranate.

PLEURISY:
carrot, cucumber and spinach juices are most helpful.

PILES
(HEMORRHOIDS) : carrot, water-cress, radish, turnip leaf, plum, prunes,
papaya and celery juices. Constipation has to be over come. Dry figs are also
very useful. They are soaked over night and taken as first thing in the morning.

PYORRHOEA: spinach, dandelion, carrot, cucumber and
turnip leaf juices are very useful. Chewing raw guava and raw spinach leaves are
also very useful. Vitamin C is essential.

PSORIASIS:
ashgourd, carrot, beetroot, cucumber and grape juices are most desirable. Juice
of citrus fruits should be avoided. After juice diet, plenty of sprouts should
be taken. Raw seeds especially sunflower, pumpkin and seasame seeds are highly
recommended. Vitamin E is highly recommended.

RHEUMATISM: celery, especially its seeds are excellent
if crushed and made into fluid. Initially orange juice is best, later cucumber,
carrot, parsley, spinach, lettuce, water-cress, cauliflower, cabbage, raisins,
prunes, figs, dates, apple, grapes, lemon etc can be taken as juices or as
fruits. Jack fruit should be avoided.

SCIATICA: celery,
cucumber, spinach juices are highly recommended.

SINUSITIS: carrot, beetroot, parsley and tomato juices.
Also recommended are pumpkin, carrot, leafy vegetable, orange, papaya and mango.
Vitamin A is highly recommended along with Vitamin C.

SORE
THROAT : pineapple, celery, prune, blackberry, grape fruit, lemon and
raisin juices are recommended. Banana and Jack fruit should be avoided.

SEXUAL IMPOTENCE : fresh fruit juices are very good
including within grapes, orange, apple, pears, peaches, pineapple and melon.
Carrot is especially very good. Dried dates and black raisins are also
recommended.

STOMACH ULCERS: ashgourd, carrot and
spinach juices are highly recommended.

TONSILITIS:
carrot, apple, grapes, grape fruit, peaches, melon, pears can be eaten or taken
as juices. Pineapple juice is also highly recommended. Sprouts are also very
useful.

TUBERCULOSIS: initially 4-5 days fruit juice
diet is recommended only. Most fruits except banana can be taken. Indian
gooseberry ie: amala should be taken. Radish is another helpful vegetable.
Lettuce and carrot are also helpful.

TUMOURS: ashgourd,
carrot, spinach water-cress, and pineapple both as raw and juices are very
helpful.

VARICOSE VEINS: both fruit and vegetable
juices are beneficial. Vitamins C & E are very helpful for this treatment.
Carrot and spinach juices prepared in 3:2 ratio are highly recommended. Other
vegetables include cabbage, turnip and cauliflower. Fruits especially orange and
lemon are also of benefit.

DISCLAIMER:

Not intended to diagnose, prescribe for, treat, or claim to prevent,
mitigate or cure any disease. The statements made on these web pages have not
been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Consumers are cautioned to
read all labels and follow all directions. Some of our products contain
stimulants such as caffeine. Some of our products contain ingredients from
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pressure, diabetes) or a medical condition (such as pregnancy) or are under the
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VEGETARIANISM & THE MAJOR WORLD RELIGIONS

Religions stress that we should treat all creatures with compassion. Yet, ten billion animals are raised in abusive “factory farms” and brutally slaughtered annually throughout the U.S.A. alone. Farmers deny animals fresh air, space to move comfortably, and fulfillment of their instinctive needs. Religions teach that people be very careful about preserving their health and their lives. However, animal-centered diets have been linked to heart disease, several forms of cancer, strokes, and other degenerative diseases. Religions emphasize sharing with hungry people. However, two-thirds of harvested grain in the U.S. and 37% worldwide is fed to animals destined for slaughter. Meanwhile, an estimated 20 million people die annually because of hunger and its effects. Religions teach that preserving and nurturing the earth is a spiritual imperative. Yet, animal-centered diets waste food, land, water, energy, and other resources, contribute substantially to soil erosion and depletion, and promote air and water pollution, tropical rain forest and other habitat destruction, and global warming. Religions stress that people should pursue peace and that violence results from unjust conditions. However, animal-based diets, by wasting valuable resources, help to perpetuate the widespread hunger and poverty that eventually lead to instability and war. Moving towards a vegetarian diet expresses one’s conviction that we should show compassion for animals, preserve health, help feed hungry people, protect the environment, conserve resources, and pursue peace. We respectfully ask those who take religious values seriously: Should we not be moving towards plant-based diets?

The major world religions all provide a sound basis for a vegetarian diet, especially as informed by advances in nutrition, ecology, and agriculture.  Now that factory farming has become widespread, animal welfare concerns underscore the imperative to avoid consuming animal products. The Eastern Religions: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism & Taoism Hinduism
Hinduism’s teachers and scriptures often expressly encourage a vegetarian diet, though not all Hindus are vegetarian.  Hindus almost universally avoid beef since they consider the cow (Krishna’s favorite animal) sacred. Mahatma Gandhi, however, took Hindu vegetarian observance one step further by declaring, “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be measured by the way in which its animals are treated.”  Hinduism’s vast scriptures contain thousands of passages recommending vegetarianism based on the profound link between ahimsa (nonviolence) and spirituality.  For example, the Yajur Veda says, “You must not use your God-given body for killing God’s creatures, whether they be human, animals, or whatever.” (12.32)  Similarly, Hindu law books base many directives on the principle of the sacredness of all life.  Manusmriti asserts, “Having well considered the origin of flesh-foods, and the cruelty of … slaying corporeal beings, let man entirely abstain from eating flesh.” (5.49) While the violence of slaughter wrongs animals, it also harms those who consume animals.  Causing unnecessary pain and death produces bad karma (ill-effects on oneself as a consequence of ill-treatment of others).  Belief in the sacredness of life, reincarnation, nonviolence, and the law of karma are central, inter-related features of the Hinduism’s “spiritual ecology.”
While Hinduism’s basis for vegetarianism is deeply spiritual, its practical merit has also been confirmed by science.  For example, the prohibition against harming or killing cows frequently benefits nutrition in India.  Zebu cattle, prevalent in India, require no special grain feed or pastures and thrive on organic material of no practical use to humans, such as stubble from harvested crops, roadside grasses, and organic garbage from the village.  Cattle contribute milk and dairy foods, labor, transportation, and dung fuel. Jainism
Vegetarianism is expected practice among Jains, who hold that it is wrong to kill or harm any living being.  Jain traditions respect ahimsa (nonviolence), aparigraha (non-acquision), asteya (respect for other’s rights) and satya (truth).  While Jains comprise less than 1% of India’s population, they contribute more than half of all the money donated in India to provide medical and other social assistance to India’s poor people. Buddhism
Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, was a Hindu who accepted many of Hinduism’s core doctrines, such as karma.  His life and teachings offered special insights into how to address problems of human existence, and he explicitly taught vegetarianism as a component of his general instruction to be mindful and compassionate. The Buddha’s first sermon, called the “Four Noble Truths,” focused on the nature of suffering and how to relieve suffering.  Bhante Henepola Gunaratna, founder and abbot of the Bhavana Society in High View, WV, interprets the Buddha’s first sermon as calling for a meatless diet: “Cultivating the thoughts of non-harm and non-injury and abstinence from killing any living being are so crucial for an individual’s peace, harmony, serenity, contentment and attaining liberation from suffering that the Buddha included these principles in the Noble Eightfold Path which is the Fourth Noble Truth of Buddhism.”  Similarly, the Surangama Sutra states, “…in seeking to escape from suffering ourselves, why should we inflict it upon others?  How can a bhikshu [monk] who hopes to become a deliverer of others, himself be living on the flesh of other sentient beings?”
It is not surprising, then, that the term “sentient beings” is used repeatedly in Buddhist writings and refers to humans and animals.  Buddhists aim to relieve the suffering of all sentient beings.  The Buddha encouraged mindfulness as necessary for leading a compassionate life, and he forbade Buddhists from engaging in occupations that involve killing animals, such as butcher, fisher, or animal farmer.

Taoism The Chinese religion of Taoism holds nature as sacred, and this view also favors vegetarianism.  Taoism teaches that yin and yang are the two fundamental energies in the world, and Taoists have always “taken the accomplishments of yin [the non-violent, non-aggressive approach] and rescue of creatures as their priority.” (Journal of the Academy of Religion, 54: no. 1, 1987)  For example, the famous Taoist Master Li Han-Kung explicitly prohibited “those who consume meat” from his holy mountain.

Taoism is distinctive in stressing simplicity.  As early as the 6th century BCE, the Taoist scripture called Tao Te Ching warned against waste (80 TTC). The Tao Te Ching teaches that simplicity allows the individual to live a peaceful life and it protects nature from overuse and pollution.  Modern studies of ecology and factory farming have demonstrated that meat production today is extremely complicated and inefficient.  The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that meat consumption is far less efficient in producing protein than consumption of beans and grains.  Because it requires far more grain, modern meat production requires more pesticides, more water, and more fossil fuel to run tractors to farm the extra fields of grain.  Burning more fossil fuel wastes natural resources and pollutes the planet.  Taoist simplicity encourages eating vegetables, grains, and fruits instead of meat.  According to the Tao, the process of meat production tends to be too yang – too aggressive; it involves extreme and unnecessary impact on the environment.  The Abrahamic Religions: Judaism, Islam, Christianity & Bahá’i Faith Jadaism
The Torah (Hebrew Scriptures) describes vegetarianism as an ideal.  In the Garden of Eden, Adam, Eve, and all creatures were instructed to eat plant foods. (Genesis 1:29-30)  The prophet Isaiah had a utopian vision in which everyone will once again be vegetarian: “The wolf shall dwell with the lamb … the lion shall eat straw like the ox … They shall not hurt or destroy in all My holy mountain” (Isaiah 11:6-9). The Torah relates God giving humans “dominion” over every living thing that moves upon the earth” (Genesis 1:28).  However, Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook, first Chief Rabbi of pre-state Israel, pointed out that such “dominion” does not give humans license to treat animals according to every human whim and desire. The Torah and the rabbinic oral tradition preserved in the Talmud and Midrash contain many instructions on how people should treat animals and the rest of creation.  Because Judaism focuses on honoring God as the all-powerful, all-knowing Creator of the universe, Judaism teaches that we should love and protect all of creation, which belongs to God.
Although the Torah states that, after the Flood, God gave humans permission to eat meat (Genesis 9:3), God also restricted humankind’s exploitation of animals.  The Jewish people are especially obligated to keep kosher dietary laws and detailed laws requiring humane treatment of animals.  Most (but not all) kosher laws deal with meat.  For example, Jews may only eat certain animals; they may not consume blood; and they may not consume meat and dairy products together.  These laws are divine decrees, given without explicit reasons.  However, one of the explanations found in the rabbinic tradition is that the permitted species are in general more peaceful and less violent than others.  This serves as an example to humans to refrain from cruelty and other base behavior.  There are mystical reasons offered for kosher laws, as well.
Judaism forbids tsa’ar ba’alei chayim, inflicting unnecessary pain on animals.  For example, Exodus 23:5 requires that one relieve the burden of an overloaded animal, and the Fourth Commandment includes the instruction that Jews must allow livestock to rest on the Sabbath.  The parameters of such laws are discussed in the Talmud and codified in the Shulchan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law).  The revered medieval legal authority/philosopher Moses Maimonides wrote that we should show mercy to all living creatures.  The 16th Century mystic Rabbi Moses Cordovero and 19th Century thinker Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch expressed similar sentiments.  By contrast, factory farms routinely confine animals in cramped spaces; often drug and mutilate animals; and deny animals fresh air, sunlight, exercise, and any opportunity to satisfy their natural instincts.  In response to this, former Chief Rabbi of Ireland Rabbi David Rosen has written, “The current treatment of animals in the livestock trade definitely renders the consumption of meat as halachically unacceptable [not kosher].”  Other rabbis, while agreeing that animals should be raised and slaughtered in humane ways, do not agree that such meat is forbidden.
Other Jewish values favor vegetarianism.  Judaism advocates treating the environment respectfully, while animal agriculture squanders water, energy, land, and other resources.  Judaism holds that human life is sacred, and we should diligently care for our health.  Since animal-based foods can increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers, we should move towards a plant-based diet.  Judaism encourages us to share our bread with hungry people.  Yet, the inefficiencies of animal agriculture waste grains and lands that could be used for staple crops, thereby depriving hungry people of food.  In summary, although Judaism does not mandate vegetarianism, many Jewish teachings support the diet.

Islam
The most holy Islamic writings are the Quran and the Hadith (sayings) of Prophet Mohammad, and the latter includes, “Whoever is kind to the creatures of God is kind to himself.”  All but one of the 114 chapters of the Quran begin with the phrase “Allah is merciful and compassionate.”  Muslims also consider the Hebrew Scriptures holy, and therefore Muslims share with Jews the teachings against cruelty to animals.  Both the Quran and the Hadith of Prophet Mohammed provide dietary laws that are similar to those of Judaism (Quran 2:172). It appears impossible for a faithful Muslim to consume meat produced by the cruel methods of factory farming.

Biographies of Mohammed have described the prophet’s love of animals and his opposition to cruelty.  The Quran states, “There is not an animal on earth, nor a flying creature flying on two wings, but they are peoples like unto you.” (surah 6, verse 38).  Mohammed taught, “A good deed done to a beast is as good as doing good to a human being; while an act of cruelty to a beast is as bad as an act of cruelty to a human being.” (Mishkat Al-Masabih)  Muslim theologian Al-Hafiz B. A. Masri, noting the cruelties of Western food production, has called the flesh “sacrilegious meat.” (Animals in Islam, p. 23) Islam also teaches that people should only eat healthy foods.  Numerous studies have shown that the products of modern factory farms, high in fat and laden with hormones and antibiotics, harm one’s health.
A distinctive element of Islam’s mystic branch called Sufism has been its call for compassion.  The great Sufi M. R. Bawa Mahaiyaddeen appealed to Muslims to reflect on the meaning of slaughter.  When describing Islamic slaughter (qurban) in his Ninety Nine Beautiful Names of Allah, he said that the knife-bearer should “… look into the animal’s eyes, he has to watch the tears of the animal, and he has to watch the animal’s eyes until it dies – hopefully, his heart will change.” (Section 182)

Christianity
Christianity, based on Judaism, prohibits cruelty to animals.  Jesus’ central teachings involved love, compassion, and mercy, and it is hard to imagine Jesus looking upon contemporary factory farms and slaughterhouses and then happily consuming flesh. Jesus often challenged people by including everyone within his circle of compassion.  He embraced all people, regardless of their ethnicity, gender, profession, social status, or medical status.  Although the Bible does not describe Jesus addressing the question of eating meat, many Christians throughout history have believed that Christian love ultimately calls for a vegetarian diet.  Examples include Jesus’ first followers (the Jewish Christians), the Desert Fathers, Turtullian, Origen, St. Benedict, John Wesley, Albert Schweitzer, Leo Tolstoy, and many others.
Jesus was much more concerned about the spirit of the law rather than the letter of the law.  He embraced theocentrism, which holds that everything comes from and belongs to God.  Like Jesus, Christians hold the Hebrew Scriptures as sacred, and Christians can affirm, as the Psalmist said, “The Lord is good to all, and his compassion is over all that he has made” (145:9).  In the face of massive suffering of animals on factory farms, dwindling natural resources, and environmental degradation, Christian principles all point towards vegetarianism.  Leading evangelical author Tony Campolo has noted, “Being a vegetarian does have benefits for a hurting planet with limited resources.” (How to Rescue the Earth, p.181)
Christians have always striven to minister to poor and hungry people.  However, today the inefficiency of meat eating works against that ministry.  In the United States 66% of the grains are fed to animals being raised for slaughter, wasting most grains’ calories and proteins.  Ron Sider of Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary has observed, “It is because of the high level of meat consumption that the rich minority of the world devours such an unfair share of the world’s available food.” (Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger, pp. 43-44).
Ironically, Sider has added, by greedily devouring so much grain-fed animal products, we are damaging our own health. (p. 44) The New Testament obligates Christians to protect their health.  For example, 1 Cor. 6:19 declares that our bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, and Christians regularly interpret this as a call to healthful living.  Knowing the deleterious effects of animal-based foods on human health, Christian principles favor a plant-based diet.

Mormonism
Mormons believe that God offered new revelations to Joseph Smith in the 19th Century, and subsequent true prophets have presided over Christ’s church on earth.  Doctrine and Covenants 58:26-29 notes that people should be righteous in all things and “do good,” including activities not commanded by scriptures.  Therefore, Mormonism encourages righteous behavior, which presumably would include kindness to animals. Mormonism condemns killing animals unnecessarily: “And wo be unto man that sheddeth blood or that wasteth flesh and hath no need.” (D&C 49:21)  Mormonism does not require vegetarianism, but it does discourage eating animals unless necessary:  12 Yea, flesh also of beasts and of fowls of the air, I, the Lord, have ordained for the use of man with thanksgiving; nevertheless they are to be used sparingly; 13 And it is pleasing unto me that they should not be used, only in times of winter, or of cold, or famine. (D&C 89:12) In other words, Mormons should only eat animals when non-animal foods are unavailable, and even then they are to consume animals sparingly.

Bahá’i Faith
The Bahá’í  Faith was founded by Bahá’u’lláh in 19th Century Persia.  Bahá’u’lláh encouraged compassion for animals, and he wrote, “Burden not an animal with more than it can bear.  We, truly, have prohibited such treatment through a most binding interdiction in the Book.  Be ye the embodiments of justice and fairness amidst all creation. (Most Holy Book, 187)  Similarly, `Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’u’lláh’s son, wrote, “it is not only their fellow human beings that the beloved of God must treat with mercy and compassion, rather must they show forth the utmost loving-kindness to every living creature.  For in all the physical respects, and where the animal spirit is concerned, the selfsame feelings are shared by animal and man.” Abdu’l-Bahá also wrote, “Ye must not only have kind and merciful feelings for mankind, but ye should also exercise the utmost kindness towards every living creature. The physical sensibilities and instincts are common to animal and man …  Sensibility is the same whether you harm man or animal: there is no difference …  Therefore one must be very considerate towards animals and show greater kindness to them than to man. Educate the children in their infancy in such a way that they may become exceedingly kind and merciful to the animals.”
Regarding meat-eating, `Abdu’l-Bahá said, “Truly, the killing of animals and the eating of their meat is somewhat contrary to pity and compassion, and if one can content oneself with cereals, fruit, oil and nuts … it would undoubtedly be better and more pleasing.” (Bahá’í National Review) Reverence for and protection of nature is a central Bahá’í tenet, which a plant-based diet generally supports.  Bahá’u’lláh said, “every time I turn my gaze to Thine earth, I am made to recognize the evidence of Thy power and the tokens of Thy bounty.” (Prayers and Meditations of Bahá’u’lláh)

Conclusion

Vegetarianism has been a common thread among the major world religions, even if only a minority have adopted the diet as an expression of their faith.  For many people of faith, vegetarianism reflects the Golden Rule: Christianity – “So, whatever you wish that men would do to you, do so to them” (Matthew 7:12); Judaism – “Do not do unto others what you would not wish to be done to yourself – that is the entire Torah, the rest is commentary” (Babylonian Talmud); Islam – “No one of you is a believer until he desires for his brother that which he desires for himself”; Bahá’í Faith – “Blessed is he that preferreth his brother to himself”; Taoism – “Regard your neighbor’s gain as your own gain, and your neighbor’s loss as your own loss”; Hinduism – “This is the sum of duty: do naught to others that which if done to thee would cause pain”; Jainism – “A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated”; Buddhism – “Hurt not others with that which pains yourself.”
With factory farming torturing animals on a scale unprecedented in human history and with the growing environmental crisis threatening human civilization, the wisdom of the world’s religions to respect nature and all its inhabitants has become much more than an expression of ideal behavior.  It has become a global imperative.

This essay was written by Prof. Gene Sager of Palomar College and revised for
the Society of Ethical and Religious Vegetarians by the SERV Writing Committee.

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